Jack Killion

Our collection of material and articles which will help you master the art of successful networking.

Business Experiences


Jack has leveraged his networking and client development skills to build a substantial, highly diversified career. Jack currently manages the Eagle Rock Diversified Fund, a successful fund-of-hedge funds, that he launched in 2001. Previously Jack started and/or headed companies in: multi-media consumer and business to business publishing (Harpers, Country Music Magazine and Wireless For the Corporate User); venture capital and industrial equipment manufacturing sectors. He partnered to develop commercial real estate properties in Florida. Early in his career Jack worked in the UK for a British technology company as head of one of their divisions and consulted with the heads of Fortune 500 type organizations while with McKinsey & Company, the leading international management consulting firm.


Jack has developed profitable business operations in various parts of the world including Europe, Asia and Latin America.


Personal Highlights


Jack's giving back started while a graduate student at MIT when he served as a Big Brother. Over the years Jack has served and continues to serve on the boards of various non-profit organizations including Medical Missions for Children, the Garden State Woman Education Foundation and the Park Avenue Club that is owned by 11 charities.


For over 20 years Jack has taught at the MBA level at Rutgers, Montclair State and Fairleigh Dickinson Universities.


Jack has a BSME degree from Yale University and a MS degree in Industrial Management from MIT. Jack is the co-founder of the Northern New Jersey MIT Sloan Business School Networking Group and is extending this networking concept globally.


Jack and his wife Judy live on Walnut Farm which they developed into one of New Jersey's top thoroughbred race horse breeding and training programs. Their son Jonathan graduated from Georgetown University and is pursuing a career in corporate turn-around management.


Jack served in the U.S. Army.

If You Only Had $500 to Spend/Month to Grow Your Business or Career How Would You Spend It?

If You Only Had $500 to Spend/Month to Grow Your Business or Career How Would You Spend It?
Recently I was asked this question which I thought was really a good one.What a great question. How would you answer it? Think about it before you read further. I think the answer is crystal clear and applies to any size business, from a one-person start-up to a Fortune 100 corporation. It applies equally to developing a career as it does to accelerating the growth of an organization. I cover my answer in my recently published book I would spend (“invest”) the $500/week by I having a business-related networking breakfast meeting at least 5 mornings a week. Let’s say the average tab for two people having some eggs or pancakes will be $20. Assume also that maybe occasionally the other person splits the check or picks it up in total. So a week’s worth of breakfast meetings should cost you less than $100, leaving a few bucks left over that you can use to have some fun. Why meet over breakfast? Almost everyone will agree to do this before their work day starts These discussions are typically to the point and under an hour They cost less than doing it over lunch or dinner. Networking at dinner meetings cuts into your...
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Is Your Firm's Culture a Competitive Advantage?

Is Your Firm's Culture a Competitive Advantage?
Every organization has a unique culture. Every law firm has one—whether a one-person firm or a leading international one. Certainly families have their own cultures as do schools, corporations, charities, governments and countries. Cultures can be an important competitive advantage or can drag on performance. In my career as a management consultant, business leader and owner, entrepreneur, adjunct business school professor and board member or trustee, I have observed thousands of cultures. Very few are truly top notch and very few are deliberately developed. Too often the culture of an organization "happens," generally reflecting the style and actions of the organization's leaders.You can safely assume that as the world economy becomes more global, more volatile, more competitive and more complex, the organizations that thrive will be the ones with a deliberately crafted culture that attracts and retains talented difference makers and fosters open, fluid cooperation, collaboration, loyalty, trust and innovation throughout the entire organization. Organizations that "get" the importance of having and developing a strong culture will have an enormous competitive edge. Going forward this will be one of the key challenges faced by law firm leaders. What Does a Winning Culture Look Like? It begins by recruiting the right people....
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A Distinguished Career Starts With Networking

A Distinguished Career Starts With Networking
To me, a really successful lawyer has it all by: doing great, impeccable client work having a loyal client base despite often paying above market fees attracting new clients and clearly being a rain maker partner in the firm having great working relation ships and friendships with others in the firm enjoying an interesting personal life with time to pursue his/her passions and interests finding time to find ways to give back to the community developing and pursuing a broad range of interests having a solid family life with all members thriving I know many, many good attorneys who can check off some of these boxes. I know very few who can check them all off. Almost all law schools turn out graduates more than capable of being good lawyers. So, if the class room isn't where the super, really successful lawyers separate themselves from the herd, when and where does the separation happen? I maintain the factor that generates the top, mind-boggling successful lawyers from the rest is their ability to network and develop important long-term relationships. And the shift from good to really successful starts when the nouveaux attorney recognizes that networking is a key factor for long-term professional...
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Be a Generator. Learn to Hunt

Every organization includes two types of producers: advisers and associates – Hunters and Gatherers. Hunters represent approximately 20 percent of advisers and associates, but consistently produce 80 percent of the new business in a firm! Why is that? Well, if you study the hunters' habits and traits, you'll discover they have seven characteristics in common. It all starts with your network and your ability to build the trusting relationships that generate positive, rewarding results. Study the hunter, adopt the hunter's behavior and become a generator! Hunters are prepared. They invest time in uncovering prospects and bring the right ideas to the meeting. They believe spectacular achievements are the result of unspectacular preparation. Hunters are relationship builders. They know that all things being equal, prospects buy from the sales rep they know, trust and like. More importantly, they understand that all things NOT being equal, buyers do the same thing -- they buy from sales reps they know, trust and like. Hunters work at the right things. They focus on those few sales activities that are attainable and make a clear difference in the lives they touch. Hunters always have a sales call objective. Intention creates a "bottom line result" as they...
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An Observation

In many corporate and professional organizations we see too much being done within silos. In the course of developing our business model for providing networking and client development coaching and training to "C" level executives and their teams, we quickly discovered how poorly internal networking is being done within the majority of organizations. Apple and Disney being two possible exceptions. They "get it." They know their people need to work together if they are to generate great products. In many corporate and professional organizations we see too much being done within silos, with very little interaction between the silos and even limited interaction within the silos at the various levels of seniority. Weak internal networking limits two things that can be critically important to the growth of your business. First it limits your organization's ability to cross sell complimentary services and products that can very positively impact your clients. We see this often in major CPA and law firms where we believe big bucks are being left on the table and all client (professional and personal) needs are not being met. In addition, the deficiency of successful internal networking slows the development of younger employees. These key people lack sufficient time...
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